A trip to Transylvania in early 2017 opened my eyes to the hidden beauty of Romania, although I’m not the first one to realize how beautiful being here is. Thousands of Brits move here each year, as thousands of Romanian’s do the opposite and flee to the UK for better living wages and opportunities. Continue reading to find out why UK nationals are leaving their home country for Romania.

By Jessi Robson

Romanian is now the second largest nationality in the UK, with more than 400,000 currently living here. For many years now, it’s become a common tradition to move here, whether it’s for short or long term work. With a diverse range of opportunities which cater for all types of people, no matter what race, sexuality, gender or religion; higher living wages and a large job market, especially for trained professionals –  it sounds like a haven, why would you want to live anywhere else? Personally, I have many reasons. As would any expat you will ask. The population is creeping towards tipping point and although you CAN survive on minimum wage, you probably wouldn’t want to. Day-trips and travelling have become frightfully expensive and if you live in the city, where all the jobs are – you probably have to pay an “arm and a leg” to get anywhere where you can truly connect with nature. Even then, public transport and even phone signal doesn’t reach the majority of the UK’s countryside.

From the moment I stepped outside the airport in Cluj Napoca, I knew I was in the place for me. I’m not alone with this, as the number of British Citizens living in Romania has tripled in the last two years, with 5,000 in 2015 and 15,300 in 2017. We’ve fallen in love with the kind and warm latin people, defined seasons and cheap living expenses – if your still earning pounds sterling. This “new generation” of Brits who come to live in RO, are usually found working remotely on their laptops, still earning in their home currency. Being able to earn “£” has left the majority of us able to invest in our own properties and form our own businesses. The nature and wildlife in Romania is completely different from what we grew up knowing in the UK with even the busiest cities still a stone’s throw away from a forest or natural spring. I’ve seen wild boars eating apples multiple times in my family’s garden in Brasov. The largest wild animal I’ve seen in the UK is a fox, feeble in comparison to the wonders of the Romanian forests.

My personal experience in Romania has been life-changing. I still live in the UK mainly but I do make sure that I come back to Brasov a few months each year. Romania has given me so many wonderful experiences and life lessons that just weren’t possible to get in the UK.  I’ve exhibited my artwork in galleries and coffee shops here, taught children to paint and met the most kind-hearted people I’ll ever have the pleasure to meet. Why will I be back? The opportunities and experiences here are endless, you should try it too.

 

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